That’s Me: Nationalism and Identity on Balkan Reality TV

Authors

  • Zala Volcic Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies
  • Mark Andrejevic Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.22230/cjc.2009v34n1a2113

Keywords:

Former Yugoslavia, Reality TV, Neo-liberalism, Individualism, Nationalism

Abstract

Abstract: In this article, we consider the themes and reception of To Sam Ja (That’s Me), a Big Brother–style Balkan reality TV show filmed in Macedonia in 2004 and 2005 that featured several cast members from former Yugoslav republics living together. Drawing on examples taken from the production and reception of To Sam Ja, we explore the way in which the show manages political and economic conflicts by transposing them into the realm of the personal.

Résumé : Dans cet article, nous considérons la réception de To Sam Ja (C’est moi), une émission de téléréalité réalisée en Macédoine en 2004 et 2005. À la manière de Big Brother et Loft Story, To Sam Ja met en vedette plusieurs représentants d’anciennes républiques yougoslaves vivant ensemble. En nous fondant sur des exemples provenant de la production et de la réception de To Sam Ja, nous explorons la manière dont cette émission gère les conflits politiques et économiques en les transposant dans le domaine personnel.

Author Biographies

Zala Volcic, Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies

Zala Volcic is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies, University of Queensland, Australia. In her research she mainly focuses on international communication, media and cultural identities. She has recently published articles 'Blaming the media: Serbian narratives of national(ist) identity', in Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies (2006); 'Yugo-nostalgia: cultural memory and media in the former Yugoslavia', in Critical Studies in Media Communication (2007); and 'Technological developments in Central-Eastern Europe: A case-study of a computer literacy project in Slovenia' (with Karmen Erjavec), in Information Communication & Society, (11)3, 2008, pp. 326-347.

Address: Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane Qld 4072, Australia.

Mark Andrejevic, Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies

Mark Andrejevic is the author of two books, Reality TV: The Work of Being Watched, and I Spy. He draws on the case studies to build a theoretical framework for considering the relation between interactive media technology, and democratic forms of political practice.

 

Published

2009-01-30