Global Governance and Postcolonial Senegalese Telecommunications Regulation: The Political Economy of Common Resources.

Oumar Kane (kane.oumar@gmail.com)
Communication, Université du Québec à Montréal
May, 2008
 

Abstract

(Dissertation is written in French.)

This research focuses on the postcolonial Senegalese state. In particular, on the role of the state in
the telecommunications sector since the country's independence in 1960 and on the interrelated question of the strategies that it has pursued in developing Senegalese telecoms. This research program is designed to simultaneously address issues of transnational governance and national
regulation as well as to identify the actors and resources that shape telecommunications in Senegal. Its focus is the postcolonial period (1960-2005); a half-century of changing trends in global governance that allows us to examine the correlative patterns of national regulation in Senegal. To adequately grasp the postcolonial state’s dual role as both mediator and smuggler one must examine the national implementation of the rationale that is imposed onto governments in
states such as Senegal by the international community. Therefore, this research is undertaken in the aim of articulating the political economy of postcolonial telecommunications regulation. Its interdisciplinary conceptual framework draws from perspectives developed in political
anthropology, International Relations and postcolonial studies in the effort to problematize concepts such as governance, regulation and postcoloniality.
The central hypothesis of this study is that the postcolonial state operates in an environment of scarce resources of various kinds. In this context, the question of telecommunications resources (frequencies, orbits and addresses) and facilities emerges as an issue of crucial economic and
political importance for the postcolonial state. The role of the state as an actor in all of this is to bridge the environment of international governance with the sphere of national regulation. The architecture of the liberalized regulatory framework defined at the international level (WTO, ITU, the World Bank) is increasingly binding and these constraints are formally relayed through a legal/rational form into the national space. It is at the national level, that their application is
instrumentalized in order to control actors and resources.
  •  Announcements
    Atom logo
    RSS2 logo
    RSS1 logo
  •  Current Issue
    Atom logo
    RSS2 logo
    RSS1 logo
  •  Thesis Abstracts
    Atom logo
    RSS2 logo
    RSS1 logo

We wish to acknowledge the financial support of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council for their financial support through theAid to Scholarly Journals Program.

SSHRC LOGO