A Society that Asks for Better Journalism

Monica Susana Cappellini
Journalism, University of Iowa, Iowa City USA
July, 2004
 

Abstract

This thesis examines chicha tabloids and their rise in a society like Lima that had experienced, five decades before, the turmoil of migrants moving from the country’s interior to the capitol. Later, the culture and traditions of the mixed population in Lima developed into a social trend that is now called chicha, something many have called unique to Latin America.
The first part of this thesis explains the contents of chicha tabloids, their publishers and historical meaning of chicha. The next section explores the array of newspapers in Lima, their format and their news style, features and the scene in which chicha tabloids originated. A critical aspect of the history of these tabloids was their connection to the Peruvian government. The exposure of this manipulative relationship jeopardized the future of this type of journalism.
This thesis also presents the experts’ critiques and statistics that indicate this form of journalism will likely decline. Now experienced and new publishers are instead producing another type of journalism; a line of serious popular tabloids sold for the same low price of the chicha tabloid. This indicates that Peruvian reading preferences are changing. As part of this wave of serious popular press, one chicha tabloid has decided to change its image toward more responsible news; although this tabloid still maintains a relationship with the dictatorship.
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We wish to acknowledge the financial support of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council for their financial support through theAid to Scholarly Journals Program.

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